MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

The Husbands of Proverbs – The Adulterer, The Pledger, The Sloth and The Mischievious

May 7th, 2018 Viewed 749 times

Adultery Takes Two: Just as the Woman Sought to Entangle, the Man Was a Willing Participant (Proverbs 2:16-19; 5:3-14; 6:20-35; 7:1-27; 23:27-28; 30:20)

There are two key questions here. The first is “Where do you draw the line?” If there is no line drawn and nothing keeping one from going further, then you will be easily tempted when you are offered the temptation. This goes for any sin, and men are especially susceptible to the willing woman as Proverbs says.

The second is the question of risk. The man obviously allowed himself to be separated alone with the woman that was seeking him. She saw him and identified him as an available target. This also goes for both sexes—do we take precautions to keep us away from sin?

photo by: meemal

Christ Has Always Been At Work

April 18th, 2018 Viewed 421 times

Christ was there At the World’s Foundation

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. – John 1:1-5

And with that declaration, the Apostle John begins his Gospel account of Jesus life an ministry. And what better way to introduce the Savior than starting from the beginning. In the beginning was the Word– the Word that was used to create everything (as Genesis stated, God spoke and it was so) is this same Word.

photo by: Claudio 

Old Testament Wives – Ruth, Abigail and Esther

April 2nd, 2018 Viewed 935 times, 1 so far today

What quality of Ruth’s is God’s focus?

Ruth is humble throughout—she stayed with Naomi, she was willing to glean food with the poor, she humbled herself in front of Boaz (looking for his direction), and was blessed because of it.  Ruth showed humility, something she didn’t need to do.  She could have stayed in Moab, she could have complained with the harsh loss of her husband and status.  She didn’t do any of this, and as such she’s in the line of David.

Ruth is one of the few discussions of Leverite marriage in that Boaz was a kinsman redeemer to her. This story plays out God’s love for us– an outsider that is chosen to marry someone with much. She is held up as an example of a godly young lady.

photo by: holl7510

Jehoshaphat – The Good King

September 8th, 2016 Viewed 1602 times
English: Josaphat was the fourth king of the K...

English: Josaphat was the fourth king of the Kingdom of Judah, and successor of his father Asa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As we have passed the Christmas season, and believe that the magi of old did not appear at the manger, but at some point later, I would encourage us to look at another set of kings—three kings in the Old Testament with whom God was pleased. These three kings of the many have a story to tell us and a path for us as we endeavor to walk in the ways and will of God.

The first of these kings is one of my personal favorites. Jehoshaphat was the son of Asa—one of the good kings of Israel. His father’s legacy was one of fighting the king of Israel, removing the Asherah—the poles that were being worshiped in the high places of Israel—and purging idol worship from the land. He followed after God like King David, and left for his son a land that was following after God.

Jeremiah 29:11 – Is Some Christians Favorite Verse Really For Them?

September 7th, 2016 Viewed 1409 times

One of the keys of understanding the Bible is understanding the context; however, many people who approach the Bible mess this up.  Whether you’re the fundamentalist that takes a verse on its own in order to generalize a law that puts you in a position of power, or the Atheist that’s taking a passage directed at Israel during the time of its Theocracy in order to say that Christians today need to not wear clothing of two different kinds of fabric, context is everything.

Compassion, The Bible and the Pro-Life Movement

June 9th, 2015 Viewed 1090 times

pregnant-mom-stress.jpgOver the weekend, Jill Stanek asked a question in her post Stanek weekend Q: How to respond to assertion abortion isn’t in the Bible?:

How do you respond to Knox and others like him who say that since abortion isn’t specifically mentioned in the Bible as a sin, it is not only not a sin but a deed to be supported as an act of faith?

From the beginning of the Bible, children have been called a blessing.  Adam and Eve and Noah and his family were all commanded to be fruitful and multiply.  Barren womb were saddened and begged God for children (when they weren’t giving their handmaidens to their husband in an attempt to get children that way– which God does not command and violates monogamy).  God commanded that someone that attacks a pregnant woman such that a baby dies owes the family for the loss.  The Old Testament writers talked about how God knit them together in their mother’s wombs, and often before birth mothers were told about the greatness of the exploits of their unborn children.

Indeed, when talking about the unborn and about children, God is anything but pro-choice.

Paul and the Old Testament

April 23rd, 2008 Viewed 1670 times

Bible and Cross I never would have guessed that the Old Testament would pose so many problems to people as I was growing up.  I mean, sure, I knew that there were laws that we didn’t follow any more.  I mean, when’s the last time I headed to the temple to kill a sheep?  I guess I never had to stop and think through the whole thing, and though reading recent discussions I can understand why many non-believers actually think that Christians are pretty selective when it comes to what they choose to follow and what they choose not to follow.

So, it sounds like something to cover, to help those that may never have thought through it, and perhaps help some make sense of it all.

The Problem With the Culture Argument

February 25th, 2008 Viewed 2989 times

Bible Header

There are many things in the Bible that we do not adhere to in today’s church.  We do not teach them as commands.  We don’t encourage people to follow them.  We try to ignore that they are even in the Bible.  And we do this because they are counter-cultural and inconvenient.

And this is part of the reasons that Christians aren’t taken seriously.  I can’t tell you how many conversations I have gotten into with unbelievers that follow this basic order:

  • We’ve all sinned and the Bible defines sin.
  • The Old Testament says that you shouldn’t do XYZ.
  • You do XYZ.
  • Aren’t you sinning?

And then after trying to get out of that one, the real fun begins.

Godly Wife: Is He Your Master?

November 21st, 2006 Viewed 11030 times

I told you this would be hard. In I Peter 3:5-6 Peter commends Sarah as being a holy woman by saying that she obeyed Abraham by calling him lord.

We’ve come a long way from this. It used to be that part of the vows that a wife took were to obey her husband. Now it’s a joke that they do not. Whether it’s feminism or just the fact that we have been trained to think of the partners as equals, this statement and the idea of there being a division and hierarchy in the family is gradually being replaced, even in Christian circles, by equality and emphasis on the women.

Here are the musings of ckhnat on this issue:

Sarah called Abraham “lord” (sometimes translated “master”). Should wives today follow Sarah’s example in calling their husbands “lord”? What does this title mean to a woman? For Sarah, it was a sign of her submission. To comply to her husband’s wishes, to please her mate, to encourage him, to yield to his preferences–some modern women might be willing to sign their names on the dotted line to the above. However, to call him “lord”?

Now, I’m not suggesting that husbands should force their wives to not address them by their first names, to call them only “master” or “lord”, but what I do think is appropriate for discussion here is what her saying the term meant and how it should be applied today.

Obviously the term connotes submission– to the Lord and to her lord. It showed what was stated in Genesis about the woman’s desire being toward the man was there. It was part of what was necessary after the fall, and for families to function.

Ladies, if you lump your husband in with your children as far as telling him what to do and when to do it– you’re not treating him with the respect God told you to have for him. You need to respect him, love him, build him up. He can be the person you expect him to be, but he doesn’t get that way by being belittled.

If you want your man to be a man, he can get that way by being encouraged when he makes decisions, by knowing that you stand with him, by hearing that you trust him, and by following his lead– regardless if you know better, and without hearing “I told you so.”

Where to Send Your Children to School

November 6th, 2006 Viewed 2116 times, 1 so far today

Studying Late

I have to believe that every Christian parent would desire that their child have a love for the Lord.  It’s debatable whether they’d actually desire that their child go into the ministry or be a missionary, but I’m sure that they desire for them to have the same or more love for God as they do.

The question that faces every parent is how to best raise their child to have that desire– especially in the area of education.

MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.