MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

First Come Our Rights, Then the Government

July 7th, 2015 Viewed 178 times, 2 so far today

Declaration of Indepedence by David Amsler

Most Americans can recite the first part of the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence, or at least paraphrase it.  It is here where we read that all Men are created equal and have been given the rights of life, liberty and property not by the government, but by “their Creator”.  It is on this that our government rests—regardless of what the Supreme Court says.

It’s nice when law professors agree:

• The rights of individuals do not originate with any government, but pre-exist its formation.
• The protection of these rights is both the purpose and first duty of government.

Our Modern Reality is Not All That Great

July 3rd, 2014 Viewed 240 times, 2 so far today
This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series The Modern Christian

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Our Form of Government Is Not The Best

In Daniel 2, we read the vision that God sent to King Nebuchadnezzar.  In that dream, we find that God called all governments after this King as inferior– and we see that He had a point.  Whatever Nebuchadnezzar said was law of the land.  When Darius the Persian conquered Babylon, the laws of the Meades and the Persians prohibited the king from changing what was signed into law (remember Daniel and the Lion’s Den).

The prophecy said that each form of government, even democratic republics, were inferior to King Nebuchadnezzar’s form of government– which is also the type of government that Jesus will have during the Millennial reign.

Will Reid Shut Down the Government?

September 20th, 2011 Viewed 603 times, 1 so far today

Right now the two houses of government are in a big game of chicken.  A budget is due at the end of the month, and since neither the Senate nor the President have put forth a budget bill, they are faced with considering a continuing resolution.

So, the Republican lead House put forth one; however, it contains less money for FEMA aid than the continuing resolution put forth by the Senate.  Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid wants to authorize the spending now, and pay for it later—we all know how well that works.

If he can’t get what he wants, he’s hinting at a government shutdown

Little Known Senate Facts

January 5th, 2011 Viewed 445 times, 1 so far today

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During the first legislative day of the U.S. Senate, it only takes a simple majority to alter rules for the governing body.  Every day after that, it takes a 2/3 majority.

What I didn’t know was that the first day of the Senate could actually span months:

Today is the first legislative day, but there appears to be (at this writing) no consensus among the majority Democrats how to do this. Oh, my. The clock is ticking. Whatever shall they do?

Stop. The. Clock.

By recessing at the end of each day, rather than adjourning at the end of each day, the clock effectively stops because the Senate will still be on its first legislative day.

This is not a new trick. In 1980 when, according to CNN, the late Sen. Robert Byrd was Majority Leader he stopped the clock and kept the Senate on its first legislative day from January 3 all the way to mid-June. [CNS News: How a Bill Really Becomes Law]

As someone that likes all this process stuff, I find this fascinating!

The American Democracy is Broken

March 1st, 2010 Viewed 896 times, 1 so far today

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Like the broken down old pickup shown above, many in America feel that the American Democracy is broken.  Putting aside for the moment that the country is actually a Democratic Republic, many believe that the officials we have in place are not cut out for the task at hand, and one wonders if that includes their own elected representative.

The Government Can

December 5th, 2009 Viewed 713 times, 1 so far today

To the tune of “The Candyman Can”—a hilarious but scarily true commentary on recent government taxation and spending.

Abortion: Should the Government Pay?

November 27th, 2009 Viewed 1222 times, 1 so far today

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The 1976 Hyde Amendment was passed to prevent people that had moral problems with abortion from having to have their tax dollars fund abortion.  This was part of the natural reaction of the Pro-Life side to the fact that the United States Supreme Court “found” the right to have an abortion hidden between the lines of the Constitution.

In the Affordable Health Care for America Act passed by the U.S. House of Representatives, the Stupak-Pitts amendment disallows any federal funds being spent on abortion.  So what’s the Pro-Choice side so up in arms about?

Governing By Fear

November 22nd, 2009 Viewed 899 times, 1 so far today

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Every party does it.  Once a party gets control of a branch of government– let alone every branch of government– the party that just got into power is overwhelming concerned about keeping that power.  In some ways this is good.  It allows for moderate government to prevail, and usually it’s the case that the country is split, not totally supporting one view or the other.

However, it also produces a clouding of policy and opinion.

Are You Going to Get the H1N1 Flu Shot?

October 22nd, 2009 Viewed 1010 times, 3 so far today

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My wife is pregnant with our fourth child.  That puts us close to first in line for the H1N1 flu vaccine—only with the conflicting stories that we hear, we’re currently favoring taking a pass.

Amazon as Big Brother

July 29th, 2009 Viewed 975 times, 1 so far today

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In Ray Bradbury’s book, Fahrenheit 451, the society at the time has been out burning different books in an attempt to quash contrary ideas and exalt the trivial:

In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury’s classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don’t put out fires–they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury’s vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal–a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad. Fire Captain Beatty explains it this way, “Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs…. Don’t give them slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy.”  [Amazon.com review]

When Amazon’s Kindle removed illegal copies of Orwell’s books (like “1984” and “Animal Farm”), many were likening it to Big Brother behavior found in “1984”.  I would liken it more to Fahrenheit 451.

MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.