MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

Inner Beauty – 1 Timothy 2:8-10, 1 Peter 3:3-4

July 9th, 2018 Viewed 507 times

Where Does Paul and Peter Derive Their Instruction about the Modesty?

Peter appeals to Sarah and Abraham—how Sarah shows her godliness through her inward attitude and how she addressed her husband. The Proverbs 31 woman would be an inspiration here.

What are the commands in these passages?

  • Women should be wearing respectable, modest apparel, not seeking to draw attention to their wealth.
  • Proper clothing for women is good works.
  • Women should be known for their inner beauty—and that should be the focus.
  • Inner beauty consists of a gentle and quiet spirit.

From these passages, what does God care about what we wear?

God cares about what we show through our clothing more than what is our clothing. The emphasis in these two passages is not on “causing a brother to stumble” or the like, but on what attitude is on display from what is worn. You see both Paul and Peter speaking out against an outward show of wealth (something we could also get from James) as well as recommending that women make sure they spend their time fostering a meek and gentle spirit. In both of these passages, these commands flow right into the idea that women should be submissive and respectful.

How do the different contexts of the two passages apply?

Authority and Responsibility – Galatians 3:28, Ephesians 5:22-33, 1 Peter 3:1-7

July 2nd, 2018 Viewed 421 times, 3 so far today

Where Does Peter and Paul Derive Their Instruction about the Submission?

Paul states that marriage shows the relationship between Christ and the church. He also appeals to the fact that in Genesis two were said to become one flesh. Peter appeals to Abraham and Sarah as a model for submission in a family.

What are the commands in these passages?

  • In Christ, there is no male or female.
  • The husband is to love the wife like Christ loves the church—self-sacrificially.
  • The husband is to instruct the wife and to help her to grow spiritually.
  • The wife is to submit to her husband’s leading.
  • The wife is to respect her husband.
photo by: be creator

Our Sunday Best – 1 Corinthians 14:26-40, 1 Timothy 2:8-15

June 25th, 2018 Viewed 210 times

Where Does Paul Derive His Instruction about the Men/Women in the Church?

First, Paul appeals to the fact that God is not the author of confusion. Next, he takes on the idea that the man is the spiritual leader in the home (Deut 6). Adam and Eve get another mention in 1 Tim 2.

What are the commands in these passages?

  • All done in church is for edification and needs to be done in order.
  • Those that are not speaking should weigh what has been said.
  • Women are to keep silent and submissive in church.
  • A woman is to ask of her husband if there is something she wishes to learn.
  • Women should be adorned modestly, showing her good works.
  • Women are not to exercise authority over a man.

Is the Pastor/Teacher/Leader Always Right?

This passage would imply that the answer is no—even if it’s someone that’s prophesying, there were to be those that judged what was said to determine whether it was so. Paul indicated that we should be aware of false teachers and false teaching, as well as the Bereans were commended for searching out the Scriptures after hearing teaching. We are not to be passive learners. This underscores the power of the home as spiritual center (Deut 6) as the woman was to seek her “head” to learn, and not just learn from that which was taught because she could be more easily deceived.

What Is a Church?

If these are rules for a gathering of the church, what is a meeting of the church? Does that include Bible Studies? Sunday School? Just Worship Services? Are we violating these teachings by how we allow for questions from anyone from any sex? In the early days, they met in homes and had more like home Bible Studies, so the idea that it’s just for in the church does not seem to fit. And yet, what would this look like?

Is the Command Cultural?

Perhaps this command was only for them, as the women might have been less educated in spiritual things, and maybe men were less tolerant and considered it high disrespect for his wife to be holding forth on the word over him. And yet what man wants another man telling his wife what is right or wrong in the Lord if that’s his duty? Perhaps the problem that we have is that men have become passive in their responsibility both to their wives and to the Scripture. They have allowed the Pastor to take the position of Spiritual authority for his home, which the Bible never gives him. While the Pastor is to care for the flock, he is never given that place of Spiritual Authority of someone else’s home any more than any other believer pointing out sin.

The Divine Order On Display – 1 Corinthians 11:2-16 – An outward display of authority

June 18th, 2018 Viewed 198 times

Where Does Paul Derive His Instruction about the topic of head coverings?

First, Adam and Eve. Paul states that woman was created for the man, and not man for the woman. Second, he references that the angels are witnesses. Third, natural order. Lastly, that all the churches of the time had wives that covered their heads and the husbands that did not. There is also a reference in here to Deut 21:13 talking about how a woman is dishonored if her head is shaven. Proverbs 12:4 talks about how the woman is the crowning glory of her husband.

What are the commands in this passage?

  • The Divine Order of Christ, Husband, Wife.
  • Every man that prays or prophesies with his head covered dishonors his head.
  • Every woman that prays or prophesies with her head uncovered dishonors her head.

What is Being Illustrated Through Whether or Not Something Is On The Head?

photo by: Emerald aqua

Divorce and the Believer – I Corithians 7:10-17, 39-40: Separation, Divorce, and Can the Believer Remarry?

June 11th, 2018 Viewed 197 times

Where Does Paul Derive His Instruction on Divorce and Remarriage?

First, from the law—Paul infers that the husband is more able/likely to divorce the wife than vice versa, choosing to use the term separate more than divorce in this passage (1 usage of wife divorcing). Second from Jesus in the Gospels—Jesus was clear in the Gospels that marriage was for life, and though He may/may not have allowed an exception for pornea, the position still was very clear.

There is some clarification to the book of Ezra in the sense that Paul tells the believers to stay married to unbelievers.

What are the commands in this passage?

  • A wife should not separate from her husband—if she does, she is to remain single or be reconciled and a husband should not divorce his wife.
  • If an unbelieving spouse is willing to remain married, they should stay married.
  • If an unbelieving spouse chooses to separate from the believing spouse, the remaining spouse is not enslaved.
  • A wife is bound to her husband as long as he lives, she may remarry after he dies, but should marry a believer, though Paul believes she would be happier single.

Does the Passage Leave Any Room for Christians to Get Divorced?

photo by: DiemLegal

Marital Intimacy – I Corinthians 6:12-7:5, 7:25-38 – Singleness, Marriage and Sex

June 4th, 2018 Viewed 137 times

Where Does Paul Derive His Instruction about the topic of intimacy in marriage?

First, from Adam and Eve—the two became one flesh. This is the key to why sexual immorality it prohibited by Paul and lays the foundation for the arguments against it. Second, from the Gospels in which we learned that Jesus said that compared to the love of family we should love God above all else. This is foundational to the ideas that Paul is going to have about why you should not marry if you can help it.

What are the commands in this passage?

  • Sexual Immorality is harmful because it is the joining of two people into one.
  • The husband’s and wife’s bodies are not their own, they are to be physically intimate.
  • Stay as you are, if you are able.

For What Purpose does Paul Say it is Better Not to be Married?

photo by: bsabarnowl

The Couples of Acts – Ananias & Sapphira, Aquila & Pricilla, and Timothy’s Mom

May 28th, 2018 Viewed 237 times

Whose plan was it and why did they do it? (Acts 5:1-2)

There was much praise heaped upon Barnabas for selling his land and buying it. Therefore, Ananias figured that he could get praise for doing the same—except he didn’t want to give it all, but figured that he wouldn’t get as much praise unless it was for the total amount. So they decided to lie and thought that no one would know the difference.

Sapphira decides to do the same thing, why?

It would seem that it would not make sense. Certainly they would know that they were a married couple and that Sapphira knew the plan means that he would have already claimed that it was the entire proceeds, this makes one wonder what she was trying to do or prove? In either case, she was given a chance to go against her husband (for she did not know that he was dead at the time) and be honest, and yet she did not.

What’s significant about Timothy’s parents? (Acts 16:1-2)

His mom was a Jew and was a Christian. His dad was a Greek, and unsaved. Yet Timothy was a disciple of Christ. This spoke to him learning the truth from his mother.

What is Aquila and Pricilla’s background? (Acts 18:1-4)

They were part of the Jews that were exiled from Rome because Claudius had commanded all the Jews to leave Rome. They cross paths with Paul in Corith. They were tent-makers just like Paul. This shows that Paul was not silent about his faith even while at work.

How do we know that they got close to Paul? (Acts 18:18)

They traveled with him, and in many of the Epistles Paul makes mention that greetings are coming from them or that they are present with him.

How did they minister to Apollos? (Acts 18:24-26)

Apollos was a great speaker and many were coming to Christ because of him. Yet he only knew of John’s baptism. Aquila and Priscilla took him along side and educated him in the truth. This wasn’t something they did in public, but they both shared in that ministry to Apollos.

Do we see any couple in Acts being separate in their decisions?

No. While there are many men that are referenced, we know that it was possible to have saved and unsaved being together, but ministry happened together.

photo by: holl7510

Jesus on Marriage – Divorce and Heaven

May 21st, 2018 Viewed 395 times, 1 so far today

What does Jesus have to say on the topic of Divorce? (Matt 5:31-32, 19:3-12; Mark 10:1-12; Luke 16:18)

The religious leaders ask if a man can divorce his wife for any reason, hoping to catch him in between two different sets of beliefs on the topic—hoping to alienate Him with one group. Instead, He takes it back to Genesis, showing that it wasn’t good for man to be alone and that God made the two into one flesh. Therefore, there is no provision for divorce. This is consistent across all passages.

So the religious leaders take him to Deut 24, and ask why Moses included divorce. Jesus tells them that it is permission, not rule, and that it was because the Jewish men had hard hearts. This goes toward the fact that the Jewish men could have treated their wives harshly before the law, and Moses was protecting the women while respecting the rights of the man. The rule did not change.

The Proper Role of Intimacy – Delight in Your Own Spouse, Be Attractive To One Another

May 14th, 2018 Viewed 407 times

Why is the Wife Compared to a Cistern or a Fountain? (Prov 5:18; Song 4:15)

In a land that had not a lot of water, she would be something of tremendous value.

What is the Significance of One’s Own Cistern?

How many people would love to have pure water that was not someone else’s? This is the value of the wife, as something that nourishes the husband. The point is that there is a source of “water” for the husband, and that is where he should be seeking it. If he is looking for it elsewhere, or his wife ends up offering it elsewhere, it’s a shame to him.

What are the fountains or rivers of water? (Prov 5:16-17)

These are the children which are brought forth from the act of marriage. These are legitimate children, whom the husband can know are his because he has been faithful.

What is the Significance of the Fountain being blessed and Joy from Wife of Your Youth? (Prov 5:18)

A woman that would have the children of her husband was blessed. We can see this in the stories of Abraham and Sarah, Jacob and Rachel, Elkanah and Hannah. In each of these cases, the women felt that they were deficient because they did not bear offspring, and when they did then they felt worth.

The idea of “wife of his youth” has more than just “marry a young wife” embedded in it. It also refers to the fact that when you married you did marry young, and had a lifetime of intimacy together. This would mean that you’d have a tight bond—in contrast to the adulterous couple in other passages.

On Whom Should the Husband Fix His Affections and What Should Satisfy Him? (Prov. 5:19)

His affections should be affixed on his wife. The allusions would make more sense in the Eastern world at the time, but these were very high compliments. The idea is that his wife is the most attractive woman that he knows, and that he is not seeking out anyone else.

The problem here is that often in marriage, both men and women can let themselves go instead of continually seeking to be attractive to their spouse. They can use the excuse that they “have to love me anyway” to mean that they will not put any effort into their appearance. I don’t get that from this passage as much as I get that the husband should not be looking to be attracted elsewhere, for he should get all he needs sexually and visually from his wife.

This falls into the idea that the husband should be intoxicated with the love of his wife. He should have eyes only for her, and her love should be something that draws him to her. Attraction is powerful.

photo by: rightee

The Husbands of Proverbs – The Adulterer, The Pledger, The Sloth and The Mischievious

May 7th, 2018 Viewed 425 times

Adultery Takes Two: Just as the Woman Sought to Entangle, the Man Was a Willing Participant (Proverbs 2:16-19; 5:3-14; 6:20-35; 7:1-27; 23:27-28; 30:20)

There are two key questions here. The first is “Where do you draw the line?” If there is no line drawn and nothing keeping one from going further, then you will be easily tempted when you are offered the temptation. This goes for any sin, and men are especially susceptible to the willing woman as Proverbs says.

The second is the question of risk. The man obviously allowed himself to be separated alone with the woman that was seeking him. She saw him and identified him as an available target. This also goes for both sexes—do we take precautions to keep us away from sin?

photo by: meemal

MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.