MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

Debating Atheism/Evolution

May 9th, 2008 Viewed 2264 times

One of the things that I’ve seen in many of the debates that I’ve recently entered about the origins of the world and the existence of God is really unfruitful and fails to recognize the complexity of the discussion.

It is rooted in the strong belief of the veracity of their side of the argument.  Very few actually enter into this debate without a belief that they know the truth.  I believe that if those people are present, they’re probably bystanders, watching exactly what will be said.

Expelled: The Movie You Have to See

April 15th, 2008 Viewed 5516 times

Expelled 250x250_ai Have you heard about this movie yet?

I started seeing ads for this movie show up at my site, but I had no idea what it was about. It turns out that Ben Stein has created a movie that documents how professors that choose not to believe in Evolution are systematically denied access to teaching positions, research positions, etc.?

This is from Ken Ham:

As you know, Darwinists have been expelling any hint of creation or intelligent design from public schools and research institutions. Now, many of them are expelling people from their academic posts in a desperate attempt to defend their evolutionary worldview. The upcoming film Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed comes to theaters on April 18.

Dawkins’ Worst Nightmare?

April 10th, 2008 Viewed 1794 times

Ken Ham Preaching Ken Ham?

The Saturday Guardian contained an article with the sub-heading, “Dawkins’s worst nightmare takes his literalist Biblical message on a tour of the UK.” The reporter came by train from London to attend my speaking events in Leicester (in central England).

I’ve personally met Ken Ham, and he’s not close to anyone’s “worst nightmare”.  Would an atheist’s worst nightmare be a person, or would it be God?

Science and God

March 5th, 2008 Viewed 2450 times

marbles

One of the interesting this to me in the whole Creation/Evolution argument is the belief that somehow science is the answer to everything and is the expert on everything. Science, it seems, can tell you both if there’s a God and what happened throughout time, and it should never be questioned.

The strange thing is that this is exactly the opposite of what science is all about.

I Hope You Saw It

February 20th, 2008 Viewed 2260 times

Eclipse Header

Try to explain a lunar eclipse to two boys that aren’t even in school.  It was a fun adventure as I tried to explain to them about the Sun, the rotation around the Earth and why the moon was going to disappear for a little while.  But that wasn’t the most interesting part of the night.

In The Old Testament, It Was a Drought

November 7th, 2007 Viewed 4216 times, 1 so far today

Desert and mountain range. Have you ever stopped to think about how differently we look at things in the age of science than they did in Bible times? I often muse on the whole concept of relying on God totally, and, in doing so, think about all that we think we understand today and what it has done to our faith.

Global Warming

In the Old Testament, God used droughts to bring people to Him. He used Joseph and a drought to bring His people down to Egypt. He used Elijah and a draught to rid his land of the prophets of Baal and to show His strength.

Number One Reason Christians Lose Their Faith

November 5th, 2007 Viewed 14650 times

way up highIf you had to guess what the number one reason for Christians that attend secular universities to leave their faith what would you guess?

I’m sure that some might guess that it would be liberal teaching.  Others would guess that they get into the wrong crowds.  And I suppose some could argue that these college students may never have been saved in the first place.

Green Eggs and Ken Ham

July 21st, 2007 Viewed 1971 times

I can remember the first time that I met Ken Ham.  His son and I were classmates in the same major at Bob Jones University.  We graduated together, so when we went to get pictures with the faculty heads in our group, we naturally ended up in the same place.  So, I shook his hand and got a photo with him.  Little did I understand who he was.

At that time I should have known his name, and his organization.  It wouldn’t be long until I was reading a lot from Answers In Genesis and learning a lot about Creation Research.

Now, everyone knows him, and they’re even making poems up about him spoofing Dr. Seuss:

I do not like green eggs.
But, I love Ken Ham, I do.
I do not like green eggs here or there.
But, I love Ken Ham anywhere!
I do not like green eggs in a box, with a fox,
In a house, with a mouse.
Green eggs make me sick just to see ’em.
But, I love Ken Ham and his (His) museum!

But seriously, what they are doing at the Creation Museum is a great testimony to the Bible and to Jesus Christ.  We need to begin at Genesis to teach people about a great God that created all things and loved us enough to send His Son to die for us.

Will the Bible Be Taught in Georgia Schools?

May 4th, 2007 Viewed 2092 times

Open Bible

This past Sunday evening we watched a sermon from Ken Ham of Answers In Genesis.  One of his central arguments for the need to defend the Bible “from the very first verse” is because we are living in a society that no longer has the Bible as a familiar frame of reference.  The number of children today that don’t know who Cain was, what Jesus did, and even who wrote the Ten Commandments are increasing.

But it’s not just the Creationists that are seeing this as a problem.  Some secularists and historians view this as a problem, but not for the same reason.

Supporters say fully understanding history, literature and political science — from the writings of Martin Luther King Jr. to the war in Iraq — requires knowledge of the Bible.

“I don’t think you can understand Shakespeare, that you can understand a great deal of literary allusions or that you can understand a great deal of Western civilization without understanding the role of the Bible,” said Pennock, a former Western civilization teacher.

The reason why schools are so hesitant goes back to the fallacious Separation of Church and State.  Schools are afraid of the lawsuits that will be brought, even though the Supreme Court and the local legislature have given the green light to teaching the Bible as literature.

The question is, should Christians support this?

On the one hand, anything that presents the Bible to people should be something we desire.  The Bible can stand on its own, it does not return void, and the more people know about the basic stories the less we have to do in witnessing to get people to understand the concept of a Creator God.  In essence, if people are instructed on what the Bible says about sin, death, and history, even though they may not believe it, you have a common starting point.

Conversely, If the Bible is presented by someone that does not agree with its teachings, the entire time could be taken up with exploring alleged contradictions.  I’ve seen this at work in a recent issue of Newsweek where the front page advertised a discussion between Rick Warren and Sam Harris.  What was sad was the fact that there was this huge introduction that basically cast the belief of God as an improvable belief, and evolutionism as fact.

But it went further than that.  The article before was about the Geico caveman.  It referenced Evolution as truth.  The one a little further about Will Smith being the most popular actor started with a reference to Stephen Gould’s explanation of evolutionary change over time.  The whole issue reflected evolution as truth from cover to cover, but paid lip service in one part of the article (the discussion itself) to being balanced.  It placed more criticism on the Christian.

The point is, I’m not sure if teaching the Bible in schools is a good thing if it’s not in a spiritual context.  God can use it, but it also means that people could use the opportunity to bash it.

Scientists Wonder, Christians Worship

February 12th, 2007 Viewed 3827 times

Hugging SkeletonsThere was an article on Global Warming that reminded me a lot of the Creation / Evolution debate. What I found interesting is that this man rightly illustrated that consensus is more important than fact in the scientific community. You see, we live in a world of influence and many voices– that and one that doesn’t know the difference between causation and relation. Scientists hold firmly to both Global Warming and Evolution and though they claim to be truth seekers, they are rather story tellers out to make sure theirs is the only one heard.

In both cases, there is tremendous information that the scientists might be wrong. And yet anyone who says such is a pariah, is maligned, and their credentials are threatened.

MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.