MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

The Value of Your Word

February 4th, 2009 Visited 1802 times, 1 so far today

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Life is full of competing priorities.  The older you get, the more you find many different things that will compete for every minute—and this is something that’s only gotten worse with modern technology.  There will be projects that need to get done, a family wanting your time, and your body won’t always cooperate.

This is why, now more than ever, integrity is one of the most valuable things that you can have.

The Power of Your Word

Getting people to trust you is very straightforward, but it’s not easy.  Basically, it means that you simply tell the truth in all circumstances and if you say you’re going to get something done, you do it.  If you do this each and every time, people will know that you, your business, your family are trustworthy—and they’ll even respect it when you say that you can’t commit to something.

Your word is valuable because it shows discipline.  It shows that you respect other people and their time.  Your word goes up against others—if you get what you promised done and someone else does not, you’ll find that your reputation for honesty and integrity will proceed you.

A Cycle of Failure

The opposite is also true.  The first time that you don’t make a deadline, the first time you don’t do what you do, you see that—on the surface—it wasn’t that bad.  You get it done a little late, and the world doesn’t fall apart.  That makes it easier to fail the next time.  Eventually, you figure that it’s ok for everything to be late, and you don’t go the extra mile.

This means that your customers, your friends, your family start believing that they can’t trust you.  They start to make adjustments based on your lack of integrity—or they may not go with you at all.

You Need Integrity

What you can do to be a person of Integrity:

  1. Vow to keep your commitments—or don’t make them.
  2. Learn to say “No” if what is being asked of you is too much.
  3. Set expectations with enough time to get the job done.  It’s better to quote longer or say it will take longer and get it done sooner than other way around.
  4. If you must break your word, make sure you set a reasonable time as to when you’ll be able to accomplish it—and give it your best (get something extra done if possible).

Comments

3 Comments

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  • Ling says on: February 5, 2009 at 10:03 am

     

    Very true. Money will only take you so far. Any successful businessman will tell you that the key turning point comes when somebody trusts you and gives you a big break. You don’t get that break unless you’ve proved you’re worthy of that trust.

    I’d add that this is about the only way you can look into a mirror and feel good.

  • Jake says on: February 5, 2009 at 2:09 pm

     

    I would change requirement number 1: “Vow to keep your commitments—or don’t make them.” to just “Keep your commitments — or don’t make them.” If you’re not keeping your promises, what good does it do to vow to keep them? That seems circular.

    Jakes last blog post..Week 4 in Review

    • MInTheGap says on: February 5, 2009 at 2:13 pm

       

      I like the way you’ve worded that. I was going for emphasis in my circular-ness, but what you say make sense as well.

MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

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