MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

Do You Need God’s Intervention?

August 2nd, 2006 Visited 4898 times, 1 so far today

Which WayWhen do you feel that you have the best handle on the will of God? For me, it seems like it’s almost after the situation has come and gone. Looking back we can see with better clarity that truly God was working in the event and that He arranged thing correctly. The other time that we can see God’s will plainly is when there’s no other thing to do but to turn to Him. Many people down through the ages have had to rely totally on God, and many people that were used mightily of Him were brought low first.

Before Paul could be a servant of the Most High God, he had to become blind and be lead around. He was also given a thorn in the flesh which he asked God to remove three times– which God denied. Paul told us the secret– that God’s power is able to work in our infirmities.

Many years before Paul, David had situations where God’s will and the pursuit of it moved from the academic to the practical. In Psalm 25, David was in a plight, and we learn that from verses 15-19.

Absolom, his son, had set a clever trap. Spending time in the city gates, interacting with the people there and his natural good looks had made him popular. The fact that he was able to convince everyone that he should be king and that David fled only helped his position. Now David was in the trap, and wanted the Lord’s deliverance from the net.

David is a unique character in many ways, but his pleas in this passage show just how much things had changed in Israel between the Goliath victory and the affair Bathsheba. Back when David had come in to fight the Philistine champion, he was the little champion. He defeats Goliath and then bests the Philistines and Saul has him kill 1,000 more to win the hand of Saul’s daughter, Michal. David does that. The people start to proclaim that “Saul has slain his thousands and David his tens of thousands.” Fast forward to Bathsheba and we see a man that stayed back from the battle, has an affiar, and now the people run to Absolom.

David’s heart was broken, as he points out in verse 17. His family is continuing in adultery. His son has taken his throne, defiled all of his wives, and sent people to kill him. The grief this king bore as a result of his sin was tremendous. He begs God to forgive him as it weighs on his heart. He was forgiven, but that did not stop him from bearing the consequences of his sin or remembering what he had done. It was to the point that David felt that he had few to turn to, and the people that were after him hated him.

Maybe you feel like this. Maybe you desperately need God’s intervention. David had a plan for how to evade his plight.

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  • Mary says on: August 2, 2006 at 10:31 am

     

    That guilt! It’s so heart-warming that God understands it and makes provision. In the OT, he had the goat offering…one goat for sacrifice for atonement of sins, and the other to turn loose to wander in the wilderness…this second goat was the “guilt offering”…how awesome to know that God doesn’t want us to wallow in our guilt but to let it go…even if you’re Andrea Yates. (no rotten tomatoes please!) I’m just saying no sin is too big for God. Except the sin of unbelief.
    Even David pleaded with God in Psalm 51:12, “Return to me the joy of my salvation” after his sin with Bathsheba. Not return to me my salvation…but the JOY of it.
    So we have to wait till tomorrow for part 4? ;O)

  • MInTheGap says on: August 2, 2006 at 10:48 am

     

    Actually, Part 4 is delayed until Friday– since tomorrow is Thursday Thirteen. Need to keep you in suspense right?

    It is amazing that God forgives us easier than we forgive ourselves!

MInTheGap

Standing in the Gap in a Society that's Warring with God.

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